Tbh, I think bias assessment is a bit different here vs. topics where the hypothesis is that there are differences between two things (you generally wouldn’t state a hypothesis in a meta-analysis, but there’s generally one there implicitly). The primary bias in research is publication bias – you slice and dice data to get significant findings, and significant findings are way more likely to get published than non-significant findings. So, if there’s high risk of bias and significant differences, you should probably assume the actual mean effect is smaller than the one you came up with.
Many women worry that weight training will somehow transform them into Hulk-ettes, so they spend hours doing cardio in order to maintain their "feminine" figure. The truth is, women just don't have the hormonal support to gain muscle mass like men. The hormone testosterone is responsible for large increases in muscle mass. Women's testosterone levels are a fraction of men's. That means you can bench press without concerning yourself about how much chest hair you might grow.
Get on all fours with feet and knees hip-width apart. Place hands shoulder-width apart and spread fingers wide. Pressing firmly through hands, lift knees off mat and straighten legs. Walk hands forward and feet backwards to adjust position. (If you have tight hamstrings, bend knees gently.) Squeeze thighs and imagine pressing them against a flat plane. Press heels down onto mat as much as possible [shown]. Keep neck relaxed and breathe deeply.
I have a question that I’m pretty embarrassed to ask in person so I’d like your opinion on it. I am a woman who prefers wearing men’s clothing. My current measurements make me fit a men’s XS. Even though I am a woman and it’s harder to build muscle, is it realistic for me to expect to bulk up at least to reach a size S or will results never be that big? I guess my question is, how much can a woman bulk up naturally by doing weight training? Thanks so much.

I’d be doing you a disservice if I didn’t mention my own workouts that are available here at Make Your Body Work. Every single workout will challenge your entire body and will include elements of cardio, strength, and core conditioning. The uniqueness of these workouts are the “difficulty levels” that provide up to 4 distinct options for every single move. This makes each workout very accessible for newbies, yet challenging for super-fit users.
Sandi! Congrats on your pregnancy — that’s so exciting!!! Honestly, my best tip for exercising while pregnant is to listen to your body! If you’ve been active stick to your normal routine (it will help you feel more normal too) and just listen to your body, pull back and modify when needed. I didn’t really start adjusting my workout routine till around 20 weeks and I slowly started modifying and now in the third trimester I’m doing lots of modifying. But pregnancy is so different for everyone so just listen to your body (it will tell you what it likes and doesn’t), stay hydrated and just try and keep moving! I stopped doing exercises on my stomach after 12 weeks, but I still do some stuff on my back if it feels ok. The main thing with bridges on your back is more when you’re at the end of second/beginning of third trimester and you want baby to be head down and doing bridges can confuse babies positioning. Again your body will tell you what it likes and doesn’t like! Hope that helps and happy #fitpregnancy! xo-Lindsey
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